#25: Be Au Sm with Joshua Peach

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Episode Summary

This weeks guest is Joshua Peach, Founder of Be Au Sm and Evangelist at ALPHA Facilities Solutions.  Joshua has over 25 years of experience working in Facilities Management, predominantly in the educational space.  On this episode, we cover the importance of owning your data, equipping  your team with the right information to efficiently manage your building, and the impact that Facilities Management teams have on the children in our school systems.  Make sure to follow the work Joshua is doing with Be Au Sm, and check out Fort Dupont Ice Arena!

Episode Transcription


#25- Be Au Sm with Joshua Peach

Introduction:

Welcome to another episode of the modern facilities management podcast brought to you by Stratum. I'm your host, Griffin Hamilton. This is the show where I interview industry experts who share their stories, strategies and insights into modern day facilities management, from hospitality, to commercial real estate, and everything in between. We'll learn what it really takes to succeed as a facilities manager. 


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton

Welcome to another episode of the modern facilities management podcast. Today, I'm honored to have Josh Peach with me, Josh, how you doing?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

I'm doing outstanding, how are you?


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

I'm doing well. I appreciate you making the time to hop on the show and enlighten us. Before we jump into the technical background that you've got and what you're currently doing, why don't you give the audience a little bit of context and who you are and what exactly you do?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

My name is Joshua Peach as you said, currently, I am the founder of Be Au Sm and I also am the evangelist representing Alpha Facility Solutions. Prior to this, I've got over 25 years of facility management experience, specifically in the CMMS, and software and tech side of things. I was a salesperson for two of the top companies from 1996, basically to last year, worked predominantly with education that's kind of my sweet spot of understanding. But in a lot of cases a building is a building, and they all need work, they don't just get built and hold together forever. So seen a lot of spaces and seen a lot of faces over the years.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Would that be nice if they just held together, there's no maintenance required.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

It's amazing how many people think that's the case, you cut the ribbon and walk away and then 50 years later you talk about all the things that it needs that you didn't take care of, in many cases 10 years later, because you didn't do much of anything. And unfortunately, the industry is highly reactive still, even though we know preventive maintenance work will actually draw down your cost of work orders by upwards of 60%.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton   

And so going back a couple steps you mentioned you've been in the industry for 20 something long years. How'd you get into it, what really brought you to facilities management?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Sold the guy cell phone. Crosstalk: makes natural transition? Yeah, quick story. I took five years to graduate in just four years of high school, it took me only five years. I wasn't a scholar. I was in community college at the time and I worked for a company called Bell Atlantic Mobile, it didn't have Verizon in the name but it turned into Verizon over the years and I was just a door to door salesman to cell phones and sunny Saturday afternoon in 1996 in August, up here in Boston, Guy called and said he was coming in to buy a cell phone, which never happened and we set to use the phonebook and call people and it was just really a lot of no’s and so when somebody calls and says I’m buying a phone, you're excited. His name is Bob Bogardus and he was late the one time he was late in the 25 years that I've known him and I waited for him, at the end he said, what do you stand to make here and I said about eight bucks. He said, why did you stay? And I said because honestly, calling people is very hard. I have to call 100 people to get one of you to buy or more. And when you call, I want to make sure that I sell you and if I do a good job, I know that you're going to tell your friends and he said do you want a job. I thought that was kind of weird back then dial up was the fast internet was sound like what a fax machine for those of you that have fax machines still sound like when you want to connect to the internet. I looked up this company, I didn't do much homework on it but I had to drive three hours to Saratoga Springs that Monday to meet the Vice President Bill Foster, who was an amazing human being. I went through a two hour interview and there was a gap on my resume of two years, I didn't have anything and I was getting up and walking out thinking I dropped the ball on the whole thing and he said, Hey, what is this two year gap in your work? You're only 22 years old. I said, well, for the ladies, I call myself an environmental engineer but I'm nothing more than a glorified toilet cleaner. I have a small property management company that I take care of the office building, but I don't have a lot of skills so I outsource a lot of the work. But I had this contract for two years that was really cool and he said that's exactly what we do; we justify your job with our software. Do you have any idea and I actually I didn't obviously, otherwise I would put on the resume and that was it. I drove three hours home and on my fax machine was an offer letter and I got hired. I worked with Bob for a year or so and through some transition ended up losing my position on the team which was okay. And then in 2004 Bob called me again he was with another company that that was up and coming and asked me to consider joining the team and I did and I did 16 years and seven months. I activated somewhere around 883 schools and universities, work with 1000s of education institutions around the country and got to meet a lot of great people. The maintenance and operations folks in education are some of the best people with pride of ownership of the jobs that they do. They live in the communities that they serve, their kids go to the schools that they serve. It's really kind of cool stuff.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

I just came this week, came from the Tennessee School plant Management Association Annual Conference and it was really interesting to talk with folks in that industry in that space where they take ownership, there's a lot of pride in what they do and it's for the kids, they realize that it's bigger than them and its common facilities in general. But having children all around you and seeing what your day to day has an impact on from an education standpoint, there's certainly ownership there. So you're exactly right.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah. If you ask any facility professional, a question you ask them, Do you live in the community that you serve in those buildings? Do you have family that lives in that community? Do your kids or did your kids go to that school? Did you go to that school? Out of those four questions, I guarantee at least two are going to raise their hands, two of them and a lot of times all four raised and many times their second or third generation in the district or in the campus because they grow up, and they see how much pride their parents or their grandparents had and they wanted that to when they get up brought up into it. It's really kind of cool.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yeah, absolutely. What are you currently doing? Because I know you've moved on from the software space. So tell us a little bit more about that.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

 I started a company three years ago, it was supposed to be actually my book, which is Be Awesome and it's TEEKA is the acronym that stands for The Essential Elements to Kicking Ass. I originally started to write a book called if you don't care, you don't count a salespersons guide to happiness, not just commission and I realized that I was very insulting in the book, which I don't like to be. So I needed to find a different direction and so I came up with the Be Au Sm. A friend actually, and a trusted advisor and mentor, actually called one morning after his run and said, Peach I got it, you wear the shirt, you talk about being awesome. It's Be Au Sm. It's the periodic elements put together and the essential elements of kicking ass and so it was supposed to be a book but my people wanted to hear my stories and wanted me to talk to them about why their jobs were important, my public speaking, requests went through the roof and we started selling T shirts, we started our own podcast, which we just found out is in the top 3% of the over 2.5 million podcasts that are out there today, which is really cool because what's unscripted, unedited, and I just do them when I have someone awesome to interview. So I've only done 93 In three years. But I was also gainfully employed with a W two and recently, in the last 10 years, I decided to take everything and put it all on the line with Be Au Sm and help a few companies because there's a lot of companies that I consider gold standard companies that just need more exposure, they need more brand help, they need people to show all of the awesome that they do. And fortunately for me, I know a number of those people. So one of the companies is Purview, which is in the medical field, they do cloud based medical record share store capabilities for hospitals, patients, any facility veterinarian, so you and I were just talking about dogs. So you can get your dog's medical records to your house on your phone and be able to view them or send them to somebody. And then the other company is a company by the name of Alpha facility solutions out of San Antonio, Texas, John and Katie Garcia, husband and wife are the owners, they have a team of about 100 down there and they just do amazing work they really do. Through my career in software, the one thing that I realized and have thought about since leaving was I did a really good job of providing a tool and it works and it's great. But the focus was to provide that tool there wasn't a lot of exploration of give you this tool now what are you going to do with it? How are you going to manage it? What are you going to put in it? And how accessible or how much opportunity you have to load your buildings, your locations, your equipment, your assets, putting in your preventive maintenance templates and tasks because most people don't have that. Anyone that's been in the business more than 10 years does pm work through their head it's through osmosis. We're strange creatures, we know what breaks and when it breaks and we change the filters on our internal clock, understanding your deficiency needs and your capital plans and it's almost like giving somebody a gun with no ammunition. This was just such a great tie because Alpha does that. Alpha is the feet on the street. So my go to guru Keith Jones at Alpha. He's up in Manassas right now and he's walking hundreds of 1000s of square feet, he's pulling ceiling tiles and getting plate numbers and serial numbers and he's collecting all that information and then once it's all collected, and measured, then we put it all into your program, where we put it into an executive summary report and a living, breathing database that you can really start to get a clearer understanding of what's on your threat radar and what work needs to be done. Because as you said you were in Tennessee this week, the one thing that I think just across the board M & O departments are wildly underfunded, and understaffed and it's because they don't have the data and the information needed and required for people to understand what needs to be done. I don't know if you're a homeowner or not, I am unfortunately. I loved it when I lived in apartment that I got to have a property manager that if I needed a light bulb changed, it seemed like they would do that. But being a homeowner, and anyone listening to this, it's a homeowner, guaranteed you have an hvac issue in the time that you're there, and they come out and the first thing they say is, when's the last time you changed your filter, and they're looking at the filter, and they know what hasn't been changed in a year and a half, and you're trying to figure out why your air conditioning is not working and everything suffocating. We as people and owning assets and property, we don't have pm systems in our house so we have no idea what is required to keep buildings running. For you to conceptually understand that, hey, we actually need to do work regularly to make sure that things run and stay running for a long period of time. Well, I don't understand that all the stuff of my house works in my house is built in 1920. You've replaced things and things have happened and you've had to replace your roof but if you don't, it starts to leak over time. So we provide all of that pertinent information to tell your story, because that's what's most important, right? We're helping M and O professionals tell their story and sell their story on the importance of their team, of the importance of the work that they do and the need to really properly staff and to maintain those spaces. Otherwise, you're going to have catastrophic failure.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yeah, and that's a great point of looking at it from a long term perspective on selling your team and the value that your team is providing, then as you're looking at projects upcoming, you need that data to go to management say, hey, I need X, Y, and Z from a material standpoint, or from a staffing standpoint, and you guys are coming in and like you said earlier, you're equipping them with that data.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah, well, it was funny. So as an evangelist, that a lot of people don't know what a true evangelist does and it's a rare title. It was started really by Guy Kawasaki, he's what put it on the map with apple in the 80s. Another great one was John Wolski, who was at Zappos and I was fortunate enough to learn from both of them and then put my own spin on it. I said in a meeting yesterday, I'm the guy that goes out in front of people and either catches the roses or the bullets, depending on what's going on and I always try to make sure that if there's bullets, I know that they're coming and so I do a very thorough scrape on any company that I want to represent or be a part of and again, gold standard companies just need some just need a little bit of help with exposure. And so I was doing some digging on Alpha, I was just struggling, they don't have a lot out there. They don't have a YouTube channel and a strong LinkedIn presence, but they do phenomenal work, and they stay really busy. But I found a video that a bank did on them, because they were the Company of the Year with this bank and John Garcia said Alpha stands for Absolute Leaders Providing Holistic Answers and I was like, that is such a great acronym and I called John immediately and I said, John, for 15 years, because I've known these guys for 15 years, they said for 15 years, I know your kids names. I know what your pet's names were and I've been trying to figure out where the Alpha comes from and I found it on a bank video. But that's really what they are. They are absolute leaders providing holistic answers for their clients and they do then they do it really well.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

And how long were you working with them until you found that out?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

The Alpha, I just found out the acronym. I started on with them on June 1 and I uncovered that about a week and a half ago. So I've been searching and looking for it. Like the first I call John I'm like, do we put this anywhere? And he says, well, we know about it, we talked about it and everybody knows what it stands for. But that's your job to let the world know that's what it means and I think it's just great. I think that I want them to put it on the bottom of the Alpha logo and I'm going to have it on my shirts because it's so fitting for what they do and what they provide for their clients.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

How long they've been around for? So, right into the 2008 2009 timeframe everything went upside down  and we're kind of seeing that right now with COVID having the impacts that it has.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Since 2007. Yeah, they opened up shop probably I would say other than opening a restaurant or a service industry based business in March of 2020, they opened up shop in the second worst climate that you could start a shop and they've been incredibly successful. Their retention of employees and clients I've never seen before. Their entire leadership has been here since the start and you hear people say things like, and when I say their leadership, that's all their managers, that's their project managers, that's their internal, we have a whole series of groups of people because they do work and all different facets of markets. So there's a very high percentage of our employee count that's been here for upwards of 11 to 13 years. People just don't leave because the mindset is take care of your team, take care of your clients, clients for life, employees for life, and they show it, they live it every single day.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

You don't see that happening anymore. I mean, sure, three to five years is a pretty good stand out of any organization, let alone 10 15 years.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah, and people could say it's a generational thing because right now we're in a very unique time, because there's still baby boomers that are working and then we have the Gen Xers and we have everything in between. I'm a Gen Xer and the generations, the baby boomers, they went to work someplace, and that's where they died, not literally died but that's where they went until they retired, until their career was over and then as progression happened, just generalization of generations that's the loyalty stopped with the millennials, right? Millennials get a bad steer for not being loyal to companies but is it really that they're not loyal to companies, or the company's not loyal to them. They're just maybe getting a little bit smarter, I don't know. But what's nice with Alpha is, they've got a little bit of everything from the age group wise, and the people just love what they do and it shows and what's amazing about that is when prospective clients get a taste of that, they're like, I want in so people that are asking, Hey, how do I work for you guys? Like how do I get a job working for you guys? And then down the road, the repeat business that they get is unbelievably high. And when someone goes to a different facility, it's like, they're the first ones that get the call. So they do amazing work and I'm just honored to just be a small part of it that gets to share my experience, and then the importance of what they do, because that's the other thing, lots of people have a job. That's just a job. They don't they don't have the purpose. They don't see that value, they don't see that difference that they make and I get to do that every day, which is really cool.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

So everything you just mentioned is great and you're the evangelist for the organization. But a question I've got what is the most difficult part of your job right now working with alpha because everything you just said and made it seem like you got a pretty easy gig there with the work that they're doing. So what's difficult there?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

I can't tell you. I honestly can't. No, you did. I mean, I woke up June 1. So I woke up June 1, with an amazing amount of elation, and excitement and energy and I have been going nonstop. I went 453 days where I hadn't traveled. I was traveling on average 180 days a year. So I lived a very exciting fast paced, any state USA anytime. I also missed out on a lot of family stuff. I have a 14 year old and a three year old and as we talked about my 150 pound South African Boerboel that is high maintenance. My fiancée, my 99 year old grandmother, my mother lived next door to me. So when I was traveling, I missed out on a lot of stuff that I really enjoyed being home and with this fit, I've traveled five days this month, not a lot. So I don't travel nearly as much. So if I were to say something like if I had to travel 180 days a year to spread the good word of Alpha, that might be a little bit of a challenge, but everything that I'm looking at, it's going to be as much travel but when you've been in the industry for a long time and you see a gap and you're able to fill that gap, you go this is it like this is that missing piece because you go to clients after a year and they love you and they're putting in their active work orders. But when I would go sell someone something, it wasn't a new building. It wasn't a ribbon cutting. I mean, I live in New England, we still have buildings that have Fallout Shelter signs next to them. These buildings are old, these buildings gone through not one or two facility directors but maybe as many as five six or 10. So there's a lot of history there. And so that gap of having that historical data is monumental you know that old saying you can't you can't manage what you can't measure. The data doesn't lie, you got to have that compelling story people have to know, when a building was done. I was talking to a school yesterday and I just said, how many toilets do you have in the district? And the facility director said, excuse me, and I said, How many toilets Do you have? How many sinks, how many urinals? How many doors, how many windows, you should know this stuff, it shouldn't be stuck in your brain. But you should be able to go to your phone today, and click and do a search on that information and be able to pull it up really quick. Because you could be in a school board meeting or a board of trustees or city council and someone could throw that at you and you want to have that. You want to be the most equipped and the most experienced and the smartest person in the room when it comes to those buildings because most of your audience and most of your stakeholders have no idea. They have no idea and they should know how many  square feet you have, but you should know how many square feet you have in a building, or you should be able to calculate it pretty close based on standards.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

What comes to mind when you bring that up? How many toilets, how many sinks and having just a detailed idea of what your facilities are, what you're managing? What's the importance, what's a quick win of having that type of knowledge?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Oh, quick wins is that you that you know your space, it's not just a building, it's not just a building that has stuff in it and so if you can show that and if you can pull a report, so I’ll give a great example. I saw this, the first place that I saw it I'll give credit to I think it's ABM that manages the Raleigh Durham airport. But one of the coolest things that I ever saw was I went into Raleigh Durham to use the bathroom because when you go to the bathroom that says you go to use it. And as I'm going to the bathroom, I looked up on the ceiling and on the ceiling, there was a number and a letter. And so that number and letter represented that specific urinal. And so when we talk about the importance, think about as a facility I am sure you have a massive following of maintenance professionals but think about a customer that notifies you of a clogged toilet. You've got a bank of toilets, and you've got a clogged toilet in the men's room on the third floor and your team, they do a ton of work that nobody knows about. So they go out, they unclog the toilet, they close the workforce at unclog toilet, second, third floor, men's room, an hour later, that same person goes in, they go into a different toilet and that toilets clogged because little Johnny likes to clog toilets with rolls of toilet paper and that person calls in or goes down in the maintenance office and go, I can't believe that you didn't take care of cleaning that toilet and unclogging it you're going to flood the school. And they said, Well, we cleaned out, we took care of the ticket. Wouldn't it be cool if you had that specific toilet that you did the first time so you could go to your customer? And because the customers not always right? They sometimes need a little bit education. You can say look, we closed the order out on toilet, h two on the second floor. We went over there and it’s h three it's a different toilet. We don't know what's broken. If we don't know if it's broken, or somebody doesn't tell us or if we don't have some sort of smart device. But being able to say we have 250 toilets, I mean, think about you got to dumb things down for people, right? Especially we're talking about public schools and community because your stakeholders, your customers, they're already angry at you, you're doing two things to them that no other business does, right? You're charging them taxes, which they have to pay, they have no choice. They can't say I don't want to pay taxes. I can choose not to go to Target and go buy a new pair of shorts, but I can't choose whether or not I pay taxes and they're always increasing. Right? And there's always this fight on am I getting value from that. So you already have an angry client. So if you can equip yourself with information to that stakeholder that's probably got one or two toilets in their house and say over the last year, we have maintained X number of toilets and we had this number of clogs and this number of replacements because people drop mads down whatever the case is, that granular data and information, puts things in perspective for people. It's kind of like when I talked to folks about explaining how space gets cleaned, not all spaces created equal. And I want to say that the average custodian the number somewhere around 27,000 square feet. But school districts in many cases are doing 40 and 50 and 60,000 square feet and not only that they're cleaning it a couple of times. So dumbing it down and saying our custodians clean the equivalent of X number of houses everyday based on what that community's average, I think the national average square foot size for houses like 1200 or 1500 square feet. So the average custodian cleans the equivalent of 40 houses, can you clean your house 40 times in a day? Now you start to realize and you start to humanize the work that people do, and how much they're actually doing. Because until you're actually in the trenches doing it, nobody can understand it. But if I had to clean my house 40 times a day, I don't clean it once a day. Right? I don't, I don't clean it all once a day, the spaces that I don't go to so why should I have to clean it again? But they clean every square inch, especially with COVID. Especially with COVID. They're cleaning every square inch of that building and now that they're opening it up, and they're having events, they're doing it a couple times a day.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

I was going to say now it's even more frequent cleaning, and even more in depth too, because now we have new vendors, we have new technologies, as far as cleaning is concerned to fight these germs and these viruses. I love that putting in perspective and putting in terms that the common person can understand and see the value there. Because I talked to a lot of people, especially with smaller teams where it's, we've got it, I've got it on the calendar, or I've got a spreadsheet, and they kind of look at the quick, or the very short term, I don't need this, but they don't have that mindset of, hey, we need this data long term and here's what that's going to do for us.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah, I mean, just think about dwell time, right? I'm sure you clean your house. Under your sink, you've got some sort of cleaning supplies Do you read the labels and see how long that needs to sit or do you just spray it and wipe it off? There's a lot of cleaning supplies that actually need a dwell time, they need to sit for a period of time. UV is huge right now and I think there's a lot of benefits to UV with a lot that I'm seeing, I love the UV towers that are mobile. So you don't need to buy light bars for every room or putting them in your Hvac system, you got a mobile light bar, but that's going to sit for seven minutes, and you have to move it around that space at least four times because it won't be effective in shadows so you have to put it in four different places it takes 28 minutes, most people don't understand that. And when you spray a cleaner to truly disinfect and sterilize a space, most of them need some form of a dwell time before they can be wiped, I know that I spent a large part of my life cleaning for appearance and not for health, I know that I've made that mistake, I know that I was impatient, I know that my countertop was dirty and filthy and I took the countertop cleaner, and I sprayed it and I followed it up with a paper towel when it was supposed to sit to really do that effective work for one to three minutes. So now today, our spaces are being cleaned for health and not just the appearance. The training has changed, the acknowledgement and understanding of the steps that need to be taken to truly do that job right. Because if they don't, people get sick and we got to stay out of this quarantine thing. I can't live in my basement for another 15 months. I'll go crazy.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

No, I’m right there with you. And so sticking on the topic of COVID, and you just alluded to the impact that from just cleaning on a daily basis, that perspective, bigger picture in facilities, what else do you see are major changes that we could see in the industry?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Well, I think that this is the first time in my career that maintenance and operations and facilities have really taken center stage, especially in education. Maintenance and operations is the second largest line item on a budget next to teacher salaries, or salaries and a lot of times you'll hear budgets getting cut, or budgets not increasing or teams are getting cut. And I see that it's really the next six to 12 months of continuing to show that importance of the work that we do that could really keep this momentum of taxpayers, tenants and others understanding that increase need and that increased cost to provide the healthiest, safest environments, whether you're living in it, learning in it, getting healthy in it, or making something in it, you really need to make sure that we show and continue to show that importance and if we don't, we're going to start to go backwards again and the importance of taking care of deferred maintenance needs. And I think that the other thing is the last 15 months, there's been a million different ideas. I talked to people that are much smarter than me and it's like, everyone's talking about MERV 13 MERV 15 filters well, yeah, that's great if the equipment can take it. But if you got a 50 year old piece of equipment that's made to have a piece of one ply toilet paper over it, and you put a MERV 15 filter over it, you could suffocate the piece of equipment, just like you could suffocate it as if you didn't change it regularly. I think bringing awareness to what's really needed is something that we're going to see and I think that a greater appreciation for the work that's been done because the M & O departments in any building anywhere are unsung heroes ,they keep us safe, they keep us healthy, and without their work the buildings crumble and they don't have good quality indoor air quality and you talk about this tons of buildings in the United States that still have asbestos. And if they're not checking for that, it's really easy for have asbestos exposure based on a cracked pipe or on the tiles that they used to put, if you're not maintaining and taking care of that stuff, you're really putting some health hazards in there. I think it's the greatest time in history right now that M & O departments can really be in the spotlight and shine and I think that they can do that, obviously, with selling their story and telling their story, the best that they ever had and it's not just about turning wrenches. I just talked to 150 project managers the other day, and I said, it's equally or more important to show the work that you do, than it is to actually do the work that you do, because you do your work behind the curtain. So if people don't see it, and it's not well documented, and if it doesn't tell the whole story, it never happened. Doesn't matter how great the building runs, it never happened.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yep. And you're exactly right. That's been a theme on the show, as well as just how little I guess appreciation is geared towards facilities and in the know, where the one benefit of the last 15 months to your point has been the recognition that they are now getting in the importance of this industry and you brought up how it's not just turning wrenches, and there's so much more to it. There's vendors, there's technology, there's different regulations now that you have to keep up with. And so it is a career that is ever evolving and has had to evolve, probably more quickly than any other industry I can think of over the last year and a half. And so with that, and again, a second theme here of the podcast is broadcasting what facilities management is and how to get into it. I would say selling cell phones probably isn't the best bit of advice, though. But looking back in with your experience, how would someone that's interested in this space to get into it?


Speaker: Joshua Peach   

There's a couple ways, great question. So I'm a huge advocate of Voc Tech schools, I don't think they're everywhere in the country. Up in Massachusetts, we've got a number of them. So learning a skilled trade, becoming a tradesperson, electrician, a plumber, Carpenter, some skilled trade, with an interest of having a leadership role, because your body breaks down over time, lifting heavy things, and climbing ladders every day that's going to get rusty and old. But finding a place that you really love, that you can make a difference and have a skill and then taking that next step of becoming a better leader. I don't know what his education is, or was, but someone I really look to is His name is Marcus LaPointe, he's in Illinois, he now works for an outsourced service provider maintenance company. But he's constantly reading books on leadership and teamwork and how to build a better team and he's doing continuous self-improvement. No one says you have to be a doctrine to be a facility director, you need to understand facilities, you need to understand people, you need to understand budgets, you need to understand, a certain number of other things and you can work your way into a leadership role and that's a very large percentage, because the pool of qualified facility directors is very limited, because there's very few education institutions in the country that actually have a program for that. So mass Maritime Academy, I think, had the first master's program for facilities management, and you didn't go to the school, you went to a hotel and [inaudible 33:26] him on Saturdays and Sundays for 50 weeks to get your degree and it was an intense, 10 hour a day, two days a week that you had to do that. Wentworth Institute I lecture at yearly, how Roy Rossi who is one of their professors there had me come in about eight years ago, and talk about the evolving technology and the importance of understanding technology, to their students to their graduating class for facilities management, these kids that are coming out that are 22 and 23 years old, they're getting director facilities positions in pharmaceutical spaces that are just awe inspiring to look at, like, architecturally just amazing, and the equipment and the needs for dust free spaces, all the suits that these people have to wear and sticky floors and all the stuff that I don't ever have to deal with, thankfully, but these kids know everything about how to handle that space, because the education they did. Lastly, is getting involved with associations. So you just talked about the Tennessee School Plant Managers Association, great group. They focus solely on K 12 public school facility directors, the National School plant Managers Association, who I was introduced to you through Keith Watkins, who is their immediate past president, and he's the facility director at New Rochelle, New York public schools, but finding associations that are specific to maintenance in the industry that you're in. I listened to a couple of your podcasts and a couple folks have talked about Efma, Great group to get a part of. Find associations that have value Ad opportunities, webinars conferences and all that other stuff and soak it all in. More importantly than anything, find a mentor. Find someone, if you're just getting into the business or you think you want to get into the business, find somebody that's been there, that's a couple exits ahead of you, and lean on him and ask them to help guide you so that you don't make a lot of the mistakes that they made, because there's a ton of them, I've made just about every single one of them in the short time that I was a property manager and I definitely made a ton of them through the course of my career. And if I had people that I would have looked to and said, Hey, did you ever do this? Did this ever happen to you? I'm sure that I would have gotten probably less strikes against me for the mistakes that I made. So mentorship, and when you join an association, be involved, don't just show up, don't treat it like a travel club, get in there, learn, offer to present, get on the board, get on a committee, do something so that you're invested into this, because the industry is fantastic. A lot of folks that get into it, they're unsure of what they wanted, what they ultimately want to do or where they want to go but they know that they want to be in the industry. They love the industry and they love the space and they love to work and they love the difference that they make because you can see it. I don't want to go into a rundown space, I don't want to go in someplace that's shiny, spick and span and taken care of. I want to go someplace that you can see a difference. I have an 800 foot long driveway and in 2014, my flower driver decided he didn't want to fly my driveway anymore. And so I said, you know what, I got a 10 horsepower, push snowblower and I said, I'm going to get my exercise in and in 2015, we had the polar vortex up here, 127 inches of snow in 27 days. And one of the most gratifying things I had was when I pushed those lines of snow and I had this big pile of snow in my driveway when I was done, it was just this cleared off sparkling clean space. You could drive a Mack truck down. It was like, wow, I made an impact and I did something right. So you can actually see if you make a difference in your facility, you see it. Whereas in a lot of other occupations, like when I'm in sales, yeah, I see it, I make sales and that was great but I didn't see the impact that I made, I didn't see the environmental change that I made, I didn't see a lot of other stuff that was made. And M&O professionals, they get to see that. They get to clean up the mess, they get to take care of the things that break, they get to fix the holes in the roof that might leak on somebody. It's really a cool occupation and like I say, the biggest challenge I think they had was they were unsung heroes that very rarely got recognized and I think that this is coming around. So


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

It's long overdue for a change and that recognition to be had and you mentioned the mentorship piece and that was a big takeaway I had from the association or the conference that we just had where everybody was willing to sit down, talk with you for a few minutes. And hey, here's the issue that I came across in my school. Did you have a similar issue? What did you do to address that, and especially over the last 18 months, it's been all new issues and new problems that we've had to come across and resolve and seeing that firsthand it made an impression, so getting involved and having a mentor really isn't as difficult as it sounds, if you are involved, you put forth the effort there.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah, the one thing that I'd say is, my career was 100% successful because I took care of one person and that person then took care of me by telling their other peers and saying, Hey, you want to go to Peach and talk to him because he can help you. It is one of the highest camaraderie communities that they care for one another. They’re not in competition for one another. So in my sales career, I wouldn't tell people my secrets. I mean, they're not secrets. Get up, work hard, care about the client make a difference in belief in the solution you provide. But I wouldn't go and spout that out to everybody that I'm competing with. Like if I had a competitor call me and they're like, Hey, how did you get so successful? I'm going to tell you my playbook here it is. I get up every morning at 4am. I make a bunch of phone calls and make sure that I care about the people and guess what I believe in what I sell. Do you do all those things? I wouldn't do that. But a facility director, they'll be like, hey, what do you use? Why do you use it? What works? What doesn't? Flipside of that is you can get lost really quick if you don't take care of them so if anybody's on the outside, looking in trying to work with maintenance and operations professionals, will tell you right now, don't do a bad job to one of them because all of them will hear about it.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

That is 100% accurate. So switching gears a little bit and I love that content and I love where the direction of the industry is going. But go back to Be Au Sm because you picked my curiosity there. Going from the idea of writing a book to now podcasts and the success you've had there. What brought that frontline for you. What made you want to get to do that and create Be Au Sm?


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Well, the first book idea was great because I was angry about something that happened as far as in the sales world that I wanted to fix, because I think a lot of people are in the sales profession for the wrong reasons. I don't typically have like this negative outlook on things for any length of period of time. I'm only human, I can have negative thoughts at times. Be Au Sm came about was to just kind of share some learning that I had through my life. I grew up a large part of my life poor or not in an affluent situation, I grew up having struggles in school. I don't want people to think that it's never too late. There's a saying that I go by, which is the best of your life lies in the rest of your life, even if today you're 80 , you can still make the best of your life. And so the idea behind that was to really kind of start to share my best practices in a book and what happened was people like to hear my best practices in real life. Then when my podcast took off, I had Santa Claus, the only person legally named Santa Claus was become one of my nearest and dearest friends who lives in North Pole, Alaska, when I did my third episode with him, and he shared with me, and it was one of the strongest moments of my life  and I talk about how much I love the education system and so often, people talk to me that are in the business, they go, well, our work or are doing this for this building, improves test scores. Well, I don't really care about test scores. I mean, I do, but it's not why I do this. I do this because every single morning in the United States, there's 3 million plus kids that are waking up in homeless shelters and the back seats of cars on someone's couch. They're in environments where they don't have hope, where they don't have love, where they don't have people smiling and being encouraging to them and they’re not in many cases in safe spaces and our schools in the United States are the safest place that they can be and it's the healthiest place that they can be. And for eight hours a day, they feel loved and they feel like there's hope, and the importance of having that facility well maintained, well cared for, and most importantly, by good people, because the custodians are the ones that hold all the keys. They're the ones that do all the lifesaving. You do a search for custodian saving child's life and there's more Heimlich maneuvers performed by custodians, because kids choked on carrots than there are any other occupation. And we're seeing custodians and maintenance directors, giving the speeches that commencements for graduation now because they're the ones that care a lot about the kids not necessarily the most, but they care a lot about the kids, they sit with the kids at recess, they talk to them. They're just so caring for what these kids in their communities are going through in a lot of cases. That's where Be Au Sm started was Santa Claus telling me about this statistic that was staggering and I'm like, Whoa, I've been in this space all this time, and I never realized it. And so if I can impact just one district, one person. This Monday, I was giving a keynote in Florida in Daytona Beach, to the Florida Association of Pupil Transportation and I call them smile providers. They're not bus drivers, because they've seen 3 million kids. It's the first and last smile opportunity that they have in the day is by a bus driver. If that bus driver opens that door in the morning, and little Johnny or Sally gets on and that bus driver has a smile, that gives that kid some hope. And when that kid gets off the bus and is going to a home that may not have the needs or might be going to a homeless shelter or might be in a foster home that's not being properly cared for and that bus driver gives a smile. little Johnny or Sally knows that they're going to be able to get on that bus tomorrow and have a smile and have hope and love again and that's huge. You can't put a price on that. You can’t put what that all means? I've been spreading that for the last three years. We've been selling T shirts because of Santa Claus. We've been giving $3 of every shirt to homeless and foster programs. Currently we're providing $3 of every shirt to the DuPont Ice Arena, which is in Ward 5 in Washington DC a tough part of town. It's the only full sized skating rink and all of Washington DC and Ty Newberry the executive director puts through 3000 Plus kids, gets them off the streets and gives them 100% Free speed figure a hockey skating lessons. Mammy Binney, the first African American speedskater that's where she trained and they provide food and drinks for anybody that comes in. They don't get a handout, they get a hand up and they have to do something so might be sweeping the floor might be cleaning up the skate ring, that might be just getting the door for people but they have to do something to get something which means you don't get any handouts in life and they're teaching lessons that are valuable, but they're also giving a lot of love to that community and so, that's where Be Au Sm was kind of created. The model, we didn't have a business plan. Like I didn't write out a business plan, say, We're going to make a million dollars and we're going to do this and this was like, we just want to make a difference and people like to hear it. Right now I do a keynote that's titled, It's Time To Celebrate and that's because people in the industry specifically in the education industry have not stopped to celebrate. If you think about it, people listening January 1 2020 was a good day. I woke up and I look forward to 2020. I wasn't thinking about COVID. I wasn't thinking about Coronavirus. I wasn't thinking about quarantine, I wasn't thinking about any of this stuff. But on March 11, when we were notified that the country was shutting down on March 13 and all of these things were going to have to take place we're going to close school, we're going to do remote learning, everybody's going to need to learn zoom. I wish I knew about that January 1 about zoom, I would have bought a bunch of stock. But we didn't know any of that stuff and what do people do? They stepped up, our maintenance and custodial staff were out in their own personal cars, delivering laptops to underserved communities that don't have technology. Their tech departments were making sure that they had Internet access. They were delivering food, they weren't delivering food to sites or just outside the building. They were driving to people's neighborhoods. And they weren't just feeding the students, they were feeding the families and these were people that were pushing brooms and turning wrenches, and bus drivers and IT staff and everyone, all of the staff in schools just stepped up. And none of them have really taken a minute to breathe. And the problem is, our customers, myself included, because I'm a customer in my community. I'm a customer to my son's school. I'm a customer to a lot of these different things, in businesses anywhere, any place that I buy something, we expect the best, and we report the worst. And then it goes on the internet. And then the world hears how bad we are. So it's important that we stop and we think about all that we've accomplished and how we do it and celebrate it. And when I talked to associations and groups about hey, they say well, what can we do? If you can be anything Be Au Sm and I go, I'd rather do it's time to celebrate, they go What? What do you mean, it's time to celebrate? Have you done enough celebrating? When I was in Florida, I'm like, Hey, guys, you should all be doing enough celebrating because I gave you Tom Brady he came down in New England and he won another Super Bowl and he wanted for you guys and he threw I don't even know how he threw the trophy, like one boat. I mean, the guys magical. It's just a mystical magical. I mean, I think he rides everywhere on a unicorn. So you got to be celebrating, but they didn't. And I think it's important that we all take time to recognize our accomplishments, whatever they are, over the last 15 years and raise a glass. Doesn't need to be booze, but raise a glass of something, and be appreciative and celebrate our accomplishments and we're one day closer to not normal or what the new normal or whatever it is. We're one day closer to being back in a situation where we don't feel so confined, we don't feel so worried, we don't feel so concerned, we're not looking at people with foreheads if they're not wearing a mask or wearing a mask. We start looking at each other with that respect and care for that we had because I know everybody miss getting hugs. I know everybody miss giving hugs and we got to get back to taking care of one another.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yeah, very well said. And you had me about 99% of the way until you brought up Tom Brady and that's a Falcons fan. Yeah.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

I forgot. That's where you were. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. What was the score in the third quarter again?. You guys went up to the third quarter?


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yeah. I've got nothing. I'm riding high on the tree [inaudible 48:42] right now. So yeah,


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

He did that twice. He did that come back of that deficit twice now in his career, didn't he? I think he did it a second time. So he made sure to let you know that it wasn't just like a onetime Fluke he’s just amazing. I got to give the guy credit.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

I got nothing. But on a serious note, where can people find Be Au Sm and the ice freak you alluded to, if you're interested in donating or getting involved, whatever it may be, but that's a great cause and love that one when people do have the opportunity to volunteer and give if they would like


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yes, so I spell B E A U S M, it'sa  three periodic elements. So it's www.beausm.com. You can buy shirts so you can see what I'm doing. It's a pretty simple website. If you want to look up the DuPont Ice Arena, they have a donation page, and that's a 501 C three so it is tax deductible. Sometimes they have matching so you want to get on the announcement. So submit your email because last month they had a very generous donor that said they had 24 hours and up to a $10,000 match. So if they raised $10,000 this person was going to give $10,000 and it was a $20,000 day forum which they need desperately. They count on those donations and Ty Newberry is the executive director there. He's an amazing human being and his contact information is there. You can reach me at Josh@beausm.com and I'm on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram. Everything that I put on Instagram or Facebook goes to Twitter so I don't even know how to use Twitter but I just know that my posts go over to the app. But I'm really active on LinkedIn and feel free to reach out to me. You want to talk to me my direct number always since the beginning of phones, when I had a phone with a cable that was 10 feet long that I stretch 20 feet to go in my room for private talk in the 80s is 508-238-5711. Again, it's 508-238-5711. I never want somebody not to be able to get ahold of me. So that's all my direct information, feel free to reach out anytime and thanks. Thanks a lot for the opportunity.


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Yeah, Josh, really appreciate the time coming on and love getting to know you and hearing your story and look forward to staying in touch.


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Yeah, no good luck with this journey. I think that anybody that wants to promote and make aware of all the great things that our facilities teams can do and are doing is admirable. So keep up the great work and getting the word out. I look forward to following more of you. 


Speaker: Griffin Hamilton  

Appreciate it. Take care, Josh. 


Speaker: Joshua Peach  

Be Au Sm. Thank you.


Outro:

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